Articles Tagged with injury attorney

A water slide at Universal’s Volcano Bay water park in Orlando has reportedly caused more than 100 Florida tourist injuries, including one man from New York who was reportedly paralyzed last year. South Florida injury lawyers

As longtime Florida tourist injury lawyers in West Palm Beach, we’re familiar with the Florida law that only requires theme parks to report ride injuries to the state when the person hurt is hospitalized for at least 24 hours. That means the actual number of injuries at theme parks are likely much higher than what’s reported to the public. Further, park visitors should know that they may have a right to monetary damages – even if their injuries didn’t meet the park’s criteria for required public reporting.

The ride in question is a series of four slides, called Punga Racers, with riders ultimately splash-landing into catch pools. According to court records and reporting by the Orlando Sentinel, the 115 injuries visitors suffered after riding the Punga Racers water slides ranged from mild to severe, and included:

  • Scrapes
  • Nosebleeds
  • Concussion
  • Neck whiplash
  • Paralysis

Two ride safety testers were also injured. But in all of those, only one – the paralysis – was considered reportable to the state. Continue reading

Injuries that occur in hospitals are mostly matters of medical malpractice, meaning they stem from substandard care provided by medical professionals. However, some hospital injuries are the result of general negligence (often due to unsafe conditions on the premises). Although hospitals are providers of care, they are also owners of property, with a duty of reasonable care under premises liability law to the general public who enter. medical malpractice

This distinction is clear in some cases. For example, a visitor slips-and-falls in a just-mopped hospital lobby that isn’t marked with a sign. Clearly, that incident isn’t a matter of medical malpractice; the visitor wasn’t even being treated. However, when it comes to patients – current, prospective or leaving – the waters can get muddied.

It’s an important distinction to make because the proof burden for these two types of cases is very different. For general negligence cases, one must simply prove defendant owed a duty of care, that duty was breached and the breach resulted in an accident that caused injuries. However, Florida medical malpractice cases, per F.S. 766.102, require claimants to prove by the greater weight of evidence that alleged actions of health care provider(s) breached the prevailing professional standard of care for that health provider. This considers whether the level of care, skill and treatment in light of all surrounding circumstances is deemed acceptable and appropriate by reasonably prudent similar health care providers. In order to do this, one must present a qualified expert medical witness testimony – and that’s long before one ever gets to the trial phase. There is also the matter of the statute of limitations (the time in which one has to file a case). In Florida, general negligence claims can be filed within four years. Medical malpractice claims have to be filed within two years.  Continue reading

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